Gratitude

Grateful everyday for the people in my life, lessons learned, and challenging situations. Grateful for the awesome and inspiring world we live in - despite its flaws. This blog is a collection of that awesomeness.

I appreciate the people in my life and what I have.

I love photography - especially landscape/nature/mountain photography. Follow me, and I'll follow you back.

(Source: inspired-for-lifee)

earthlycreations:

Moraine Lake
distant-traveller:

Saturn at equinox

How would Saturn look if its ring plane pointed right at the Sun? Before August 2009, nobody knew. Every 15 years, as seen from Earth, Saturn’s rings point toward the Earth and appear to disappear. The disappearing rings are no longer a mystery — Saturn’s rings are known to be so thin and the Earth is so near the Sun that when the rings point toward the Sun, they also point nearly edge-on at the Earth. Fortunately, in this third millennium, humanity is advanced enough to have a spacecraft that can see the rings during equinox from the side. In August 2009, that Saturn-orbiting spacecraft, Cassini, was able to snap a series of unprecedented pictures of Saturn’s rings during equinox. A digital composite of 75 such images is shown above. The rings appear unusually dark, and a very thin ring shadow line can be made out on Saturn’s cloud-tops. Objects sticking out of the ring plane are brightly illuminated and cast long shadows. Inspection of these images is helping humanity to understand the specific sizes of Saturn’s ring particles and the general dynamics of orbital motion. This week, Earth undergoes an equinox.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

distant-traveller:

Saturn at equinox

How would Saturn look if its ring plane pointed right at the Sun? Before August 2009, nobody knew. Every 15 years, as seen from Earth, Saturn’s rings point toward the Earth and appear to disappear. The disappearing rings are no longer a mystery — Saturn’s rings are known to be so thin and the Earth is so near the Sun that when the rings point toward the Sun, they also point nearly edge-on at the Earth. Fortunately, in this third millennium, humanity is advanced enough to have a spacecraft that can see the rings during equinox from the side. In August 2009, that Saturn-orbiting spacecraft, Cassini, was able to snap a series of unprecedented pictures of Saturn’s rings during equinox. A digital composite of 75 such images is shown above. The rings appear unusually dark, and a very thin ring shadow line can be made out on Saturn’s cloud-tops. Objects sticking out of the ring plane are brightly illuminated and cast long shadows. Inspection of these images is helping humanity to understand the specific sizes of Saturn’s ring particles and the general dynamics of orbital motion. This week, Earth undergoes an equinox.

Image credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

0rient-express:

Into the Blue | by Michael Breitung | Facebook.
kevwil:

"Sunrise" by ginaups (http://bit.ly/1AELzRk)

kevwil:

"Sunrise" by ginaups (http://bit.ly/1AELzRk)

(via navalarchitecture)

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

—   Maya Angelou (via feellng)

(via livegenuinely)